Ironova Ankkoro

With advancements in technology changing the gaming experience – from immersive 3D sound to very real visuals thanks to virtual reality – you have to wonder what else could make gaming more life-like. Maybe factoring in our emotions…? That’s what Ironova had in mind when they created Ironova Ankkoro.

Ironova Ankkoro Wearable Senses Your Emotions as You Game

The wrist wearable is designed to track the user’s emotions as they play a game (whether it be panic-stricken or full of peace) and adjust their gaming experience accordingly. For example, if you’re panicked, your visuals will look like you are panicking. Ironova believes for the game to be more life-like it should also reflect your real-life emotions when you are nearIronova Ankkoro death and so forth. Video games “generate immersive situations, new and playful. But the
interactivity it provides is not complete. The emotional state of the gamer is not taken in account and does not change anything to the scenario. Fear reduces the field of vision, it makes us shaking, stress makes decision taking slower, pleasure or relief drive the vigilance down… These are realities, but no game is able today to integrate those parameters,” the French company writes via a press release.

Ironova Ankkoro

 

Ankkoro Gamotion Manager, also called “the heart of the game,” will make sure to detect and affect your game accordingly. The wearable acts as a transmitter and catches the biometric signals from the wearer. It then reads the vitals and modifies the game to reflect that. The digital interface can sense and alter the game based on 11 emotions the gamer can go through including fear, stress, calm, concentration, surprise, and serenity.

Ankkoro was developed by Ironova and a university lab specialized in cognition sciences in hopes of the wearable also being used to assist in training health and safety officers (firefighters, paramedics, etc.) for real-life emergency situations.

 


Ironova Ankkoro
will officially debut at CES 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada in January.