Empire Ears EVR vs Campfire Audio Jupiter Comparison Review

Empire Ears EVR vs Campfire Audio Jupiter

Both the Empire Ears EVR and the Campfire Audio Jupiter sit toward the bottom of the spectrum of their high end lines. For those looking in their price range, of between $699 and $799, which of these two unique IEMs are right? Today I’ll take a closer look with this Empire Ears EVR vs Campfire Audio Jupiter Comparison Review.

Empire Ears EVR vs Campfire Audio Jupiter Comparison Review

In the Box – Empire Ears EVR vs Campfire Audio Jupiter Comparison Review

Empire Ears EVR Campfire Audio Jupiter
Empire Ears EVR IEMs Campfire Audio Jupiter IEMs
eartips eartips — Campfire, silcone, foam
cleaning tool cleaning tool
cleaning cloth lapel pin
drawstring pouch Campfire Audio Raw Leather Case
hard shell case documentation
Pelican storage case detachable MMCX cable with 3.5 mm connector
documentation
detachable 2-pin cable with 3.5 mm connector

Design – Empire Ears EVR vs Campfire Audio Jupiter Comparison Review

Driver Housings

Both The Empire Ears EVR and the Campfire Audio Jupiter are medium/large size IEMs. They have a similar general shape, although EVR has a curvier design and the Jupiter is more angular. Additionally, the EVR’s housing is a little bit thicker in comparison to the slightly more slender Jupiter. Despite this size difference, the Jupiter, whose housing is made of machined aluminum and coated in Cerakote, is a bit heavier. The EVR feels lighter, and as a result, more delicate.

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Cables

The cables of both the Empire Ears EVR and the Campfire Audio Jupiter utilize Litz designs. In other words, their wires are individually insulated and braided together. However, there are a few major differences to their designs. The most noticeable difference which is visible from a distance is their materials. The EVR’s cable, which is made by Effect Audio, consists of UPOCC copper. The clear jacked around each wire shows its copper color proudly. On the other hand, the Jupiter’s cable, which is made by ALO, contains  silver-coated copper (likewise proudly sported through a clear jacket). The braids on this cable are wound tighter than the EVR’s.

The other major difference between the two cables is that the Empire Ears EVR connects to its driver housing via a 2-pin connector. Conversely, the Campfire Audio Jupiter connects to its housing via MMCX connectors.

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Drivers

Both the Empire Ears EVR and the Campfire Audio Jupiter harness the balanced armature drivers The EVR has three drivers: one dedicated to low frequencies, one for middle frequencies, and one for high frequencies. On the other hand, the Jupiter has four balanced armature drivers. Two of them are focused on the low frequencies and two of them are focused on high frequencies.

Sound – Empire Ears EVR vs Campfire Audio Jupiter Comparison Review

Low Frequencies

The tonalities of the low end frequencies of the Empire Ears EVR and the Campfire Audio Jupiter are quite different from each other. In a general sense, the low frequencies of the EVR feel lighter than the Jupiter. However, despite this sense of attenuation, it is remains quick and punchy with a light emphasis on the middle of the low frequency spectrum. In contrast, the Jupiter’s low frequency response contributes to a sense of realism. It feels fuller and more even across the low frequency spectrum and transitions smoothly into the low mids. Like the EVR, the Jupiter has a sense of quickness and punchiness, but it isn’t as dynamically active as the EVR.

For example, when I was listening to the song Normal by Conor Oberst and the Mystic Valley Band, the kick drum had a realistic tone when I listened with the Campfire Audio Jupiter. It’s pitch felt accurate with a proper balance of harmonics. Additionally, it seemed to have a  healthy and entertaining amount of low frequency extension. On the other hand, the EVR emphasized a higher part of the low frequencies, closer to the higher mids. As a result, some of the lower harmonics were quieter in the mix, so while the low frequency pitch felt accurate, the tonality wasn’t as complex. On the contrary, more of the energy of the kick drum came through via the sound of the beater, which brings us to the midrange.

Middle Frequencies

While the Empire Ears EVR and the Campfire Audio Jupiter handle the middle frequencies differently from each other, they both are capable of representing harmonically complex instruments in a forthright way. The EVR is light on the low mids and midrange, but emphasizes the high mids (both with a high-mid boost and a quick and active transient response). As a result, vocals and attacks tend to sit higher in the mix than they normally do. Conversely, the Jupiter has a strong low-mid response with softened high-mid frequencies. As a result, guitars, synths, and other instruments with thick midranges have a great sense of body. However the attacks of pianos, horns, and vocals tend to have less detail.

For example, when I was listening to the song In Love In Vain by Keith Jarrett, the piano sounds are pretty different depending on the earphone. Although both the Empire Ears EVR and the Campfire Audio Jupiter are able to keep up with the pianos energy as it grows throughout the song, they do so in different ways. The EVR emphasizes the clarity of the hammers of the piano because of its quick response to its transients. It has a pretty tone that feels twinkley in nature. Additionally, it reveals the complexity of the piano by revealing its upper harmonics. On the other hand, the Jupiter gives the piano a thicker, richer tone. It reveals the piano’s complexity by exposing its lower harmonics. While it’s a less pretty tone, it contributes to the groove of the song by emphasizing the left hand a bit. Additionally, the low-mid clarity and thickness brings the upright bass forward.

High Frequencies

In a general sense, the Empire Ears EVR has a brighter sound signature than the Campfire Audio Jupiter. However, looking a bit closer, it seems both earphones emphasize the high end, but in different ways. The EVR emphasizes a broad range of high frequencies and boosts them a fair amount. As a result, the highs have a more even response than the Jupiter. However, its overall result brings the high frequency instruments forward in the mix. This works well with genres like pop (and anything that appreciates high end clarity and emphasis). On the other hand, the Jupiter emphasizes a narrower band of high frequencies. This light emphasis happens at the high end of the high frequency spectrum. As a result, it acts peripherally in the way it affects the tone of high frequency instruments. Rather than affecting the tone, it more so adjusts the way bright instruments attack and the way they sit in the soundstage. Generally, I like the way this emphasis feels on male vocals rather than female vocals because it sometimes comes across as unevenness on female vocals.

For example, when I was listening to the song Diamond Heart by Lady Gaga, the Empire Ears EVR provided a beautiful sense of airiness to her vocal in addition to making it sit louder in the mix. Additionally, the brighter synths and the kick beater sit more forward in the mix as well. On the other hand, the Jupiter feels darker and the mix levels feel more uniform. However, the high-high boost makes her vocal air and texture stand out more, yet sounds a bit unnatural because of the way that boost contrasts with the softness of the high-mids.

Soundstage

Both the Empire Ears EVR and the Campfire Audio Jupiter have impressive and lively soundstages. The quickness and brightness of the EVR gives it a lot of precision in the left-to-right imaging. However, its quieter low-end response makes its center feel slightly less solid. Additionally, its sense of height is top-leaning because of its high frequency emphasis.  Meanwhile, the Jupiter has an active and precise sense of height because of the contrasts between its low frequency extension and high end boost. It’s left-to-right imaging has less expansion than the EVR but has a stronger sense of center. However, the width is greatest when listening for widely panned high-frequency-rich instruments. Additionally, its sense of depth is well done with nice contrast between the foreground and the background instruments.

For example, when I was listening to the song Quizas Quizas Quizas by Pink Martini, the percussion provided a lot of height for the Empire Ears EVR and Campfire Audio Jupiter. The strings, piano, and bass sat back in space with the Jupiter. It created a nice contrast to the upfront vocal. The EVR revealed less contrast but the left and right response felt more active and wide.

Overview – Empire Ears EVR vs Campfire Audio Jupiter Comparison Review

Overall, the Empire Ears EVR and the Campfire Audio Jupiter are different earphones despite their design and price similarities. The EVR is better for folks looking for a brighter, more detailed earphone. The Jupiter is better for those looking for a thicker sound signature with a deeper soundstage.

The Empire Ears EVR and the Campfire Audio Jupiter are available for the best price at Audio46.

Empire Ears EVR at Audio 46

Campfire Audio Jupiter at Audio 46

Best IEMs Empire Ears EVR vs Campfire Audio Jupiter